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Fact or Fiction: Birth Control
by Staff
Not every sexual encounter has to end in a baby, thanks to the phenomenon of birth control. If you're sexually active, but not ready to be a mother or a father, you should protect yourself. How much do you know about your options?

Most condoms are made of sheepskin.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Most condoms are made of polymers.

It's OK to use oil-based lubricants with condoms.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You can use oil-based lubricants with some condoms.

The most common side effect of the birth control pill is lowered libido.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The most common side effect of the birth control pill is spotting.

Even if they use the birth control pill correctly, 5 out of 100 women will get pregnant each year.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Fewer than 1 out of 100 women will get pregnant if they always use the pill as directed.

The birth control pill thickens cervical mucus and thins the lining of the uterus.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Switch that -- the pill thins cervical mucus, while thickening the lining of the uterus.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the birth control pill in 1951.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It was 1961.

NuvaRing, the birth control vaginal ring, should be left in place for three weeks.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The ring should be left in place for five weeks.

You should only put the birth control patch on your stomach.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's OK to use the patch on your shoulder in addition to the stomach.

To use the birth control patch correctly, you should change the patch every month.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You change the patch every two weeks.

An IUD is shaped like the letter "L."

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's shaped like the letter "T."