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Fact or Fiction: Botox
by Staff
Botox injections seem to be all the rage these days -- but is it true that Botox is actually a poison that can cause paralysis? Take this quiz and find out.

Botox is the brand name of a toxin that can cause botulism.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's closely related to it, but it's not a toxin.

Botulinum toxins cause muscle paralysis by releasing a chemical into the nerves.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: They block the chemicals that tell your muscles to contract.

Botulism can cause paralysis, but it won't kill you.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Botulism is only fatal if you also happen to have chronic heart disease.

Botox was first approved for conditions like uncontrollable blinking and lazy eye.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Botox helps uncontrollable blinking, but not lazy eye.

In 2000, Botox Cosmetic was approved for use on frown lines between the eyebrows.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Botox was also approved for under-eye wrinkles in 2000.

The effects of a Botox injection can be seen the next day.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It takes about three to seven days to see results.

If you get a Botox injection in July, you might still be frown-line-free by the holidays.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You'll have to get another injection if you want a smooth face for your Christmas cards.

You can get Botox injections under your arms to decrease sweating.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Doctors think Botox might work for excessive sweating, but it hasn't been tested yet.

After a Botox injection, you shouldn't rub the area for a few days -- it could diminish the effects.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Rubbing could cause the Botox to migrate to a part of your face you didn't intend to be affected.

Most insurance companies will pay for cosmetic Botox injections.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's only covered if your insurance isn't through an HMO.