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Fact or Fiction: Breast-feeding
by Staff
Parents make lots of choices before their little one arrives in the world: What shall we name him or her? How will we decorate the nursery? What doctor will be our pediatrician? One decision parents must grapple with is how to feed the baby. Some parents go for bottles and formula, while others choose to breast-feed. How much do you know about the latter option?

During pregnancy and right after birth, a woman will make thick yellow breast milk known as colostrum.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The thick yellow substance is known as lactation release.

Foremilk, or the milk that comes out of the breast first during a feeding, is much thicker than hindmilk.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Hindmilk is the thicker substance.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends exclusive breast-feeding for the first nine months of a child's life.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The AAP's recommendation for exclusive breastfeeding is six months.

The breast-feeding support group La Leche League was formed in 1958.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: La Leche League has been around since 1858.

Thanks to the numerous health benefits associated with breast-feeding, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) believes the U.S. could save $10 billion in annual health care costs if more women breast-fed.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The figure is closer to $4 billion.

According to some studies, women who breast-feed have a higher risk of breast cancer.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Breast-feeding doesn't seem to affect breast cancer rates.

A study published in 2008 revealed that children who were breast-fed scored 20 points higher on tests of verbal intelligence by the time they were in the first grade.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The breast-fed children scored no differently than the other children.

It's impossible to get pregnant while breast-feeding.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's impossible to get pregnant during the first nine months of breast-feeding; after that, it's possible.

According to La Leche League, the ideal time to store human breast milk in the refrigerator is 72 hours.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: La Leche League says the ideal time is 24 hours max.

Breast-feeding can save you $655 to $920 each year, depending on the cost of formula.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The savings are bigger: $1,1,60 to $3,915 each year, depending on the brand of formula