HOW STUFF WORKS
QUIZZES

FOLLOW US
Fact or Fiction: Dandruff
by Staff
Dandruff is a pretty common -- and embarrassing -- condition. The good news is, treatment is easy: Some dandruff shampoo should do the trick for most people. But what happens when your shampoo stops working? Take our quiz and find out.

If you have dandruff, it's probably because you're shampooing too much.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's because you're not shampooing enough.

Eczema can cause dandruff.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Eczema causes flaking on other parts of your body, but not on your scalp.

A fungus called <i>Pityrosporum ovale</i> could also cause dandruff.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's not a fungus -- it's a microscopic mite.

Most people have this fungus on their scalps, but people with dandruff tend to have more than others.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The fungus is present only in people who have dandruff.

If your dandruff flakes are yellowish and greasy, it could be a sign of psoriasis of the scalp.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's actually an indicator of sebbhoreic dermatitis.

People with ALS sometimes have more <i>Pityrosporum ovale</i> on their scalps than other people do.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's people with Parkinson's Disease who could have excess fungus on their scalps.

Coal tar is a common ingredient in antidandruff shampoos.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Coal flakes are a common ingredient.

When you're using an antidandruff shampoo, you should rinse it out immediately after lathering.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You should leave it in about 10 seconds, but no longer.

If a certain antidandruff shampoo works for a while and then stops working, you should see a doctor.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You should just switch brands and see what happens.

Cradle cap is a form of dandruff in babies.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Baby dandruff is actually called colic.