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Fact or Fiction: Animal Pests
by Staff
It's the rare homeowner or gardener who lives a pest-free life. If it's not the mice in the attic, it's the squirrels on the tomato plants, right? Take this quiz and test your knowledge of animal pests -- and how to get rid of them.

You can spread orange peels around your plants to deter deer from eating them.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Try mothballs or fabric softener instead.

Moles don't like castor oil.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Moles don't like canola oil.

Human hair is one of the most effective rabbit deterrents.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Human hair is a good bear deterrent.

One way to get rid of raccoons is to place a radio near their hiding place and play some talk radio.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Any kind of music usually works better than talk radio.

A raccoon made its way to an observation deck on the Empire State Building in August 2009.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The raccoon was actually on the roof of City Hall -- not the Empire State Building, but still 25 stories up.

Skunks are scared of balloons.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Skunks love balloons, so you might want to rethink that outdoor birthday party if there are skunks in the 'hood.

A good pest control technician can distinguish between mouse and rat odors.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The only way to tell if you have a rat or mouse infestation is by the droppings.

Rats have a 72-inch (1.8-meter) vertical jump.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Rats can't jump vertically -- only horizontally.

One pair of rats typically produces about 1,000 descendants in a year.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's actually mice that have that many offspring.

Mice can chew through anything that's softer than their teeth.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Mice, unlike rats, chew only through food items.