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Fact or Fiction: Forklifts
by Staff
Forklifts are an important part of our manufacturing industries. Think you know all there is to know about them? Take the quiz and find out how these powerhouses came about, how they lift our heavy stuff and where technology is taking them.

The Tructractor, which was built in 1917 to move materials at an axle plant, helped pave the way for the forklift industry.

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The first forklift was invented by Toyota in 1923.

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The development of power steering and standardized battery sizes helped increase production of forklifts.

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Shortly after electric forklifts were invented, many were designed with a typically rechargeable battery that could last about eight hours.

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In the 1950s, forklifts were built to raise materials up to 50 feet (15.2 meters), which was higher than ever before.

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For safety purposes, forklifts were equipped with brakes in the 1980s.

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Forklifts are part of an Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) classification called industrial trucks.

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The seven types of forklift classifications are determined by things like the types of forklift wheels, power sources and the terrain they drive on.

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Forklifts only use pneumatic tires, made of a durable rubber that can go outdoors. They're similar to the tires used on cars.

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Besides the frame, counterweight, mast, forks, back rest and overhead guard, another basic element that makes up a forklift is the power source.

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To operate a forklift, drivers must pass a physical that includes an eye exam.

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Forklifts aren't just used in the warehouse; they can be used on construction sites as well. These forklifts are called rough-terrain forklifts.

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Battery-powered forklifts are an efficient alternative to internal combustion engine (ICE) forklifts, and the all-electric units typically outlive their ICE counterparts.

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In 2010, orders for electric forklifts accounted for about 25 percent of all forklift orders.

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The Yale Materials Handling Corporation incorporates regenerative braking into some of their forklifts so energy can be sent back into the batteries during braking.

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Forklifts are beginning to use alternative sources of power. In fact, about 20 percent of all new forklifts make use of some sort of solar power.

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The Sidewinder is a relatively new type of forklift that can move in any direction.

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Automated forklifts are sometimes used to pick up and drop off materials without the need for a driver.

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Automated forklifts are currently used only in the automotive industry.

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Automated forklifts use a sonar guidance system to maneuver through warehouses and factories.

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