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Fact or Fiction: Orthomolecular Medicine
by Staff
You may have never heard of it, but you’re probably familiar with some of its basics, like taking vitamins and minerals. No harm there, right? Not necessarily. Test your smarts about orthomolecular medicine with this quiz.

Taking lots of vitamin C can prevent you from catching the common cold.

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Orthomolecular medicine was named by Nobel Laureate Dr. Linus Pauling.

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“Orthomolecular” means “big molecules.”

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Orthomolecular medicine is a branch of mainstream medicine.

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It can be difficult to find a doctor who practices orthomolecular medicine.

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Orthomolecular medicine is a new field of medicine.

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If you're deficient in vitamin D, that’s known as having scurvy.

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Orthomolecularists have claimed to treat cancer through dietary changes and the use of vitamin and mineral supplements.

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Orthomolecularists follow the USDA’s Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) when prescribing vitamin and mineral supplements.

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Treatment in orthomolecular medicine depends on the person because each one has a unique biochemistry.

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Orthomolecular psychiatrists believe that some mental illnesses are caused by allergies.

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Orthomolecularists have generated names for conditions that have not yet been recognized by the medical community.

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Orthomolecularists advise their patients to immediately stop their traditional medications in favor of orthomolecular treatment plans.

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It’s not possible to overdose on a vitamin.

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Orthomolecular medicine is 100 percent safe and has never harmed anyone.

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Orthomolecularists are criticized by mainstream medicine for not providing scientific proof of their results.

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Practicing orthomolecular medicine can be illegal.

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Orthomolecular medicine practitioners claim that they had to create their own journal because mainstream medical journals wouldn’t accept their articles.

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You can follow the basic tenets of orthomolecular medicine on your own.

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Orthomolecular medicine therapies are expensive compared to mainstream medicine.

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  • Fiction