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Fact or Fiction: Pregnancy and Skin Care
by Staff
You always hear about that pregnancy glow, but for every pregnant woman with radiant skin you'll probably find three dealing with acne, stretch marks and itchy bellies. Take this quiz to learn about the causes and care for pregnancy skin conditions.

If you have melasma -- otherwise known as "the mask of pregnancy" -- upping your banana intake will help the hyperpigmentation fade.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You'll need to up your intake of anything that contains lots of potassium, not just bananas.

Melasma is caused by insufficient protein intake during pregnancy.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The cause is actually excess protein.

Melasma is most common in women with dark hair and pale skin.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Women with dark hair and olive skin are most susceptible to melasma.

Don't bother with prescription creams if you have stretch marks -- the best remedy is drugstore lotion.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The best remedy is actually mayonnaise.

That "pregnancy glow" is probably caused by increased blood flow in the tiny blood vessels just beneath the surface of your skin.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Blood flow actually decreases in these small blood vessels.

Eczema is the most common skin problem among pregnant women.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's acne, not eczema, that's the most common.

Pregnant women should avoid acne products that contain zinc oxide.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid are the ingredients to avoid.

The linea negra is a dark pigmented area that runs down the center of a pregnant woman's belly.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The linea negra appears on the cheeks of a pregnant woman.

One of the most common causes of pregnancy-related belly-itching is a condition called PURRR.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's called PUPPP.

Stretch marks are most likely hereditary -- there's really nothing you can do to prevent them.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: If you exercise frequently and watch your diet, you could prevent stretch marks.