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Fact or Fiction: Scar Removal
by Staff
We all have scars, although most of them are pretty minor and easily hidden or overlooked. But sometimes a scar is just too big, strangely shaped or discolored to be ignored. The good news is that most scars can be reduced or removed fairly easily -- but what happens when it's not so easy? Take our quiz and find out about your other options.

Most scar removals are covered by health insurance.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Cosmetic scar removal usually isn't covered.

Scars are made of collagen, which is a different color and texture than your skin.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Scars are made of kelatin.

One common scar-removal method is silicone injections.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's cortisone injections.

Most scars can be removed quickly, on an outpatient basis.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: About half of all scars require surgical removal.

Only a small percentage of scars can be totally erased.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: About a quarter of them can disappear without a trace.

Doctors can actually move scars during removal surgery.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Well, they can't move a scar from a leg to your arm, but they can change its position a bit.

One scar-removal method is skin resurfacing with a carbide laser.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's a zinc-based laser.

A pulsed dye laser uses yellow dye to decrease a scar's redness.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's purple dye.

If you have an indented scar, your doctor might use a collagen injection to fill it.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Collagen is used on raised keloid scars.

Chemical peels are a common method of acne-scar removal.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Acne scars are best treated with topical ointments.