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Fact or Fiction: Shaving
by Staff
Men (and women) have been shaving for thousands of years -- from cavemen removing facial hair with sharpened shells to modern men disposing of beards with five-bladed razors. Test your knowledge with this shaving quiz.

The Book of Deuteronomy contains a specific prohibition against shaving beards and the hair on the sides of the head.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's Leviticus.

Alexander the Great set the clean-shaven standard for men in ancient Greece.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Greek men followed the fashionable example of Julius Caesar.

Well-to-do men in ancient Rome wore beards but shaved their heads daily.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Moustaches were the fashion of the day in ancient Rome.

American men wore beards up until World War II.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The fashion for shaving started during the Depression.

Gillette introduced the safety razor in 1901, which made it easier for men to shave their beards.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Schick introduced the safety razor.

The U.S. Army bought razors in bulk from Gillette during World War I for hygiene reasons.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The soldiers had to shave so they could wear gas masks.

Gillette spent a nickel on each razor blade and sold them for a dime each.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The razor blades cost a penny to make.

In 2005, Procter & Gamble bought Gillette for more than $50 billion.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Johnson & Johnson bought Gillette.

American women were moved to start shaving in 1915 when a model appeared in Vogue with bare underarms.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The magazine was Harper's Bazaar.

Schick created the electric razor in 1953.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Nope, it was Gillette again.

The first electric razor had a motor the size of a grapefruit.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It was even bigger than that -- about the size of a small watermelon.

Despite its inconvenience, the electric razor was an instant hit.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It took a few years for the electric razor to catch on.

Gillette struck again in the '60s with the twin-blade razor.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: They introduced it in the '50s, but it didn't take off until the '70s.

The enormously popular Gillette Mach 3 appeared on the market in 1991.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It was 1998.

Schick countered with the Quattro, which Gillette answered with the five-blade Fusion.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Schick's product is called the QuadShave.

But the mother of all razors is the rare Platinum Mach 14, available only to American Express black-card members.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The Platinum has 12 blades.

The best shaving brushes are made from water buffalo hair.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's boar bristles that you want.

Most shaving creams contain the same basic ingredients.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: There are glycerine-based shaving creams and soap-based products.

You should always shave before a shower.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Shave after a hot shower.

The razor is the most popular grooming tool ever invented.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: That honor should probably go to the tweezer.