HOW STUFF WORKS
QUIZZES

FOLLOW US
Fact or Fiction: Skin Allergies
by Staff
Most of us have had skin allergies at one point or another -- be it hives from a certain food or a mysterious rash. But could your asthma be linked to your skin allergies? Take our quiz to find out what kinds of things can really get under your skin.

You can get hives as big as dinner plates.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Hives are only about as big around as a pencil eraser.

Angladema is a condition similar to hives, but the swelling happens under the skin, not on top.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's angioedema.

Hives and angioedema are allergic reactions caused by histamines.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Hives have to do with histamines, but angioedema doesn't.

There is a wide range of things that could cause histamine release.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Chemicals in foods are what cause histamine release.

Cooked foods cause hives more often than fresh foods do.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It doesn't matter if the foods are cooked or fresh.

If you get a skin reaction from coming in contact with an allergen, it's called allergic contact dermatitis.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's called concussive dermatitis.

Epidermal dermatitis (otherwise known as itchy rash) is the most common skin condition in adults.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's most common in children.

About 30 percent of Americans report a case of hives every year.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's more like 15 percent.

Seventy percent of people with eczema have a family history of allergies or asthma.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's only about 10 percent.

If you have a rash of unknown origin, one of the first things you should do is stop drinking orange juice.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You should stop using your body lotion.