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Fact or Fiction: Skin and City Living
by Staff
City living is exciting, but it can wreak havoc on your stress levels -- and also on your skin. Is your skin suffering because of pollution and smog? Find out now!

When the sun's rays hit smog-related ozone in the atmosphere, they break up into free radicals, which damage your skin.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Free radicals are good for your skin, not bad.

You can put ozone into two categories: good (way up in the stratosphere, protects us from the sun) and bad (near the ground, a key component of smog).

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: All ozone is the same, and it's all bad.

Free radicals do chip away at cell walls, but they don't cause lasting damage.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Free radical damage has been linked to wrinkles, but nothing really serious.

Young people are more susceptible to free radical skin damage because their skin cells are immature.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: No matter your age, everyone's equally vulnerable to free radicals.

Free radicals steal your skin's oxygen supply, causing premature aging.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Free radicals rob your skin of collagen.

Polluted air can also increase your risk of rosacea.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: All kinds of skin irritation can be attributed to polluted conditions, but it's more often linked to eczema than rosacea.

One way to combat free radical damage is to increase your skin's supply of vitamin B, through your diet or in skin-care products.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Yes to vitamins, but not so much to vitamin B: The key here is antioxidants, which are found in vitamins A, C and E.

If you live in a smoggy city, you might not be getting enough vitamin D from the sun.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Smog can get in the way of vitamin E, not vitamin D.

The skin reacts to stress in much the same way as it does to ozone exposure.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: In terms of skin damage, ozone exposure mimics the effects of a diet lacking in protein.

If you live in a polluted area, you don't need to worry about sunscreen -- the smog blocks the sun!

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You still need sunscreen, but SPF 8 is sufficient.