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Fact or Fiction: Skin and Weather
by Staff
Weather changes, and so does your skin. Changes in temperature, humidity and sun exposure can do a number on your skin or make skin conditions worse. Whether you're trekking to work in wintery weather or enjoying a sunny day outside, your skin — the largest organ in your body — bears the brunt of your exposure to the outside world. Test your knowledge on how to protect your skin from the elements.

To avoid the damaging effects of the sun, you should wear sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher to protect your skin from UVA rays.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Your sunscreen should protect you against UVB rays, too.

In freezing temperatures, many victims of frostbite don't know anything's wrong because their skin and body tissues are numb.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: People who develop frostbite from cold weather always notice it.

Glands in your skin are less likely to produce oil in humid environments.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The weather doesn't affect oil production in the skin.

Dry weather intensifies the redness or itchiness caused by skin conditions such as eczema (atopic dermatitis).

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's the opposite -- they are worse with humid weather.

Windburn is caused by blasts of dry, cold air and exposure to the sun.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Flying debris -- including snow, saltwater or sand -- can also cause dryness.

After coming in from a cold and dry winter day, you should relax by taking a long, hot shower.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Short, hot showers are completely fine.

People with dark skin or tans don't need to wear sunscreen.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: People with a tan do need to wear sunscreen, whereas naturally dark-skinned people do not.

Frequent dips in the pool during the summer can strip your skin of natural oils.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's true, especially in water with chlorine in it.

Sun exposure is the most harmful for your skin between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. standard time (between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. during daylight saving time).

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The sun is equally harmful, no matter when you're outside.

As you get older, your skin is more likely to be affected by the weather.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Actually, it's the opposite -- your skin gets used to it.

Before going to an outdoor barbecue on a sunny day, you should put insect repellent on before sunscreen because both products work better that way.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You should never use sunscreen and insect repellent simultaneously.

Acne will probably clear up in the spring and summer months since sunlight is known to treat acne.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: With sunscreen, of course!

Even during the winter months, skiers and snowboarders risk skin damage because snow reflects around 80 percent of UV rays.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Being exposed to the sun at higher altitudes makes the rays more intense, too.

Weather conditions don't contribute to someone developing heat rash -- an irritation of the skin caused by sweating.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Heat rash has nothing to do with indoor conditions either.

If you have dry skin and cold-weather itch, you should bathe less often and avoid using more soap than needed.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Don't skimp out bathing or soap!

People who take certain medications can experience side effects after spending time in the sun.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's exposure to tanning beds, not natural sunlight.

In dry and cold weather, it's a smart idea to lock moisture in your skin by using lotion or moisturizers before venturing outside.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Even better, you should clothe exposed skin areas, too.

Clouds can protect your skin from harmful UV rays.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: They hinder gamma rays as well.

Wind chill and skin have nothing in common.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: They have one thing in common: Wind chill is defined as heat loss from skin exposed to the wind and cold.

Applying sunscreen 10 minutes before going outside on a sunny day will provide full SPF protection.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Applying it immediately is just as effective.