HOW STUFF WORKS
QUIZZES

FOLLOW US
Fact or Fiction: Summer Skin Care
by Staff
Summer skin care is all about sunscreen, sunscreen, sunscreen. But beyond sun protection, what skin-care habits do we need to change in the summer months? This quiz will give you some handy tips on how to keep your skin looking its best.

You should wear sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 at all times.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: That's true for fair-skinned people, but most people just need to have it on when they're in the sun all day.

When the ultraviolet, or UV, index is low, it usually takes unprotected skin a few hours to burn.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: A fair-skinned person will burn in an hour, even when the UV index is low.

When the ultraviolet, or UV, index is high, your skin can burn in as little as 10 to 15 minutes.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: When the UV index is high, your skin can burn in as little as 20 to 30 minutes.

Even on a cloudy day, your skin can be exposed to all of the sun's UV rays.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: On a cloudy day, you'll get UVA rays but not UVB rays.

You should apply sunscreen 20 to 30 minutes before going outside.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: That's too early -- wait to apply until right before you go outside.

You should reapply sunscreen during the day based on how fast your skin burns when it's unprotected.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Just reapply every two hours, or sooner if you've been in the water.

You should be extra sure to put sunscreen on your hands -- they'll show sun damage before anywhere else on your body.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's the nose you need to worry about most.

The Sun Safety Alliance recommends that you wear a hat when the UV index is 5 or higher.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The SSA recommends hats at all times, no matter what the UV index.

Babies can (and should) start wearing sunscreen a week after birth.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Sunscreen is actually unsafe for children under the age of one.

You should use only sunscreens with broad-spectrum protection.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You should make sure the sunscreen offers UVB protection, but UVA isn't necessary.

UVA rays are what give you sunburn, and UVB rays are responsible for wrinkling, sagging and other signs of sun damage.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: They both give you sunburn, but only UVA rays cause your skin to wrinkle

Men over the age of 40 spend the most time outside and get the most annual doses of UV rays.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Kids under 18 receive the most sun exposure.

Be extra vigilant with your children in the summer -- 80 percent of sun exposure happens when you're a kid.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's not quite that high -- about half.

You can stay in the water twice as long with 'water-resistant' sunscreen as you can with 'waterproof' sunscreen.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's the other way around.

If you have oily skin, you shouldn't moisturize in the summer -- it will just make things worse.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You should still moisturize, but just change your moisturizer.

In the summer, you should be diligent about scrubbing your face if you have oily skin.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Everyone needs to do a little extra face scrubbing during the summer months.

Here's another tip for you oily-skinned people: Step up to three face-washings a day, if you can, during the summer.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Even if you have oily skin, washing your face twice a day in the summer is sufficient.

More for those of you with oil-slick issues: You might want to use a cleanser with salicylic acid at night during the summer months.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Salicylic acid is great for dry skin, but if you're more oily you should use a cleanser with alpha hydroxy acids.

Foaming soaps are the most effective kind to use in the summer because they dry up oil.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You'll want to steer clear if you have dry skin.

Noncomedogenic moisturizers won't clog your pores, which is especially useful in the summer months.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Noncomedogenic moisturizers not only keep your pores clean, but they actively fight acne.