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Fact or Fiction: Sunburn
by Staff
We've said it before, and we'll say it again -- wear SPF 30 every day, even if you're not sunbathing! Take this quiz to learn how to protect your skin from the skin -- and what happens when you burn.

The most dangerous time of day for sunburn is between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's actually from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

UV exposure doubles with every 1,000-foot rise in elevation, so you really need to watch the sun when you're skiing.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: UV exposure triples with a 1,000-foot elevation gain.

Another reason you need to be careful in the mountains is that snow reflects the sun, increasing your sunburn chances.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Snow does reflect sunlight, but the UV rays aren't reflected.

The southern United States gets twice as much sunlight as the northern part of the country.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The South gets 1.5 times more sunlight.

Your skin can start to burn after an hour of sun exposure.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It usually takes about two hours for skin to start to burn.

UVA and UVB rays are both responsible for sunburn.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Only UVA rays damage the skin.

Tanning beds produce only UVB rays, so they don't damage the skin or cause as much sunburn as the sun does.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Tanning beds produce only UVA rays.

If you have a bad sunburn, you'll probably feel the strongest effects about 12 to 24 hours after sun exposure.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: The worst effects are usually about three to four hours later.

A sunburn can make you throw up.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: If you've vomited after a sunburn, it's probably just a coincidence.

The best thing to do for a bad sunburn is to slather your skin in oily lotions and ointments.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Use lotions, but sparingly.