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Fact or Fiction: Surviving an Animal Attack
by Staff
What happens if you accidentally encounter an animal that feels threatened or frightened by you? What if it attacks? Take this quiz to see whether you've got what it takes to survive or if Mother Nature will reign supreme.

You're face to face with a grizzly bear. You stand your ground, but the bear charges at you several times. Your best option is to run away.

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If you encounter a wolf that isn't afraid of humans, you should make yourself look bigger while throwing rocks or twigs near it to discourage it from coming closer.

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Your nature-loving friend got a little too close to a copperhead snake while photographing it, and it bit him on the leg. To increase his chances of survival, you should suck the venom out of the wound with your mouth.

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If you ever feel the sharp sting of the box jellyfish, you should apply a bandage to the sting immediately.

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You disturb a hive home to hundreds of Africanized honeybees, and they begin to chase you. Your best option is to jump in your neighbor's pool to get away from the bees.

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On the show "MythBusters," Adam and Jamie had a close animal encounter while jabbing hungry sharks underwater.

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Unlike venomous snakebites, venomous spider bites can be rinsed and iced.

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Insect repellant, insecticidal nets and antimalarial drugs can protect you from one of the world's most dangerous animals.

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If you find yourself within feet of a grizzly bear, you should wave your hands in the air to make yourself look bigger while slowly backing away without making eye contact.

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You're approached by an aggressive mountain lion. In addition to making yourself look bigger and throwing things, you should maintain eye contact with the animal.

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Though alligators rarely take on larger prey, they sometimes attack humans. If an alligator grabs you, you should try to fight back so you can escape.

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If you ever find yourself in the jaws of a shark, you should NOT fight back. The shark will think you're dead and let you go.

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A long-tailed macaque -- a type of monkey from Southeast Asia -- escapes its enclosure at a zoo and is roaming free. As it approaches, you should let it know you mean no harm by smiling and waving.

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If a mountain lion attacks you, it will probably try to bite your head or neck. To survive, you should crouch to the ground and curl up in a fetal position.

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If you happen to encounter a rhinoceros ready to charge, the best way to escape is to run in the opposite direction of its charges.

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Few people in the United States die from venomous snakebites, yet around 4.5 million people are bitten each year.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests that in the event of a dog attack, children should "roll up into a ball and lie still."

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If you're bitten by a venomous snake, you should NOT put ice on the wound or drink alcohol or caffeine.

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An Alaskan moose thinks you're threatening her calf, so she knocks you over. You should stay on the ground until she turns her back to you.

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Climbing a nearby tree is an effective way to escape an aggressive elephant.

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