HOW STUFF WORKS
QUIZZES

FOLLOW US
Fact or Fiction: Waterless Urinals
by Staff
Waterless urinals? Don't let the phrase scare you. These odd-sounding fixtures are actually a clean and affordable way to limit water consumption. Take this quiz to test your knowledge about these water free toilets.

Waterless urinals produce less bacteria than urinals that flush with water.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

One of the downsides of waterless urinals is that sewer gas can potentially escape from the drains.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

Waterless urinals are more expensive than traditional urinals.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

Waterless urinals were invented in 1991.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

To prevent a waterless urinal from smelling, you need to flush the drain daily with bleach.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

The average urinal in the United States uses between 1 and 3 gallons of water for each flush.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

A single waterless urinal can save an average of 45,000 gallons of water per year.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

In the United States, about 250 billion gallons of water are flushed down the drain every year through urinals.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

Waterless urinals do not require any regular maintenance once they have been installed.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

"Traps" are removable cartridges used in many waterless urinals to regulate the flow of urine.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

The sealant used in waterless urinals is made from vegetable oil.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

Sediment from pooled urine builds up in the traps of waterless urinals.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

According to a 2010 U.S. Army mandate, all new Army facilities are required to use waterless urinals.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

Flushing urinals can send urine and dirty water into the air when they flush, contaminating bathroom surfaces and the clothes of those standing nearby.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

For years, waterless urinals were illegal in much of the United States.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

Standards for waterless urinals are described in the Unified Plumbers Code.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

Installing a waterless urinal requires installing a special type of non-corrosive pipe for the drain line.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

Installing a waterless urinal can count toward a LEED certification for a building.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

To install a waterless urinal, your drainage pipes have to have a specific slope, at least one-quarter inch for every foot.

  • Fact
  • Fiction

The Taj Mahal in India has waterless urinals installed in its facilities.

  • Fact
  • Fiction