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Fact or Fiction: Waxing
by Staff
To wax or not to wax? Yes, pulling your body hair out by the roots can be pretty painful, but many women (and men) swear by it. There are risks, though -- do you know everything there is to know about waxing?

If you wax your legs, you don't have to deal with touch-ups as often as you would if you shaved them.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: This is true only if you use a special lotion immediately after waxing.

After you wax, the hair usually grows back in a few months.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It usually takes a few weeks.

If you're doing some at-home waxing, you should exfoliate a few days before you plan to wax.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You should exfoliate the day before.

You should apply wax in the opposite direction your hair grows and then pull it off in the direction of hair growth.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You should do both things in the direction of hair growth.

Your hair needs to be at least a quarter of an inch long in order for it to be waxed.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Your hair should be about a half-inch long.

After you wax an area of your face, it can be soothing to apply a product that contains chamomile.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You should use a product with goldenseal.

Waxing is a good way to avoid ingrown hairs.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: You'll avoid ingrown hairs only if you get professionally waxed.

Your hair might not grow back if you're a frequent waxer.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: This is an old wives' tale -- it takes longer to grow back, but it always does.

If you have osteoporosis, you shouldn't wax.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: It's people with diabetes who should avoid waxing.

If you have sensitive skin and want to try waxing at home, you should buy a sugar wax.

  • fact
  • fiction
  • almost fact: Microwaveable beeswax is the way to go if you have sensitive skin.