80% of People Can't Name These Sports Movies From a Screenshot. Can You?

By: Craig

About This Quiz

HEY, BATTER, BATTER. HEY, BATTER, BATTER, SWING! When it comes to your favorite films, what genre do they fall in? If you're a fan of sports, they can range from drama to romance to comedy. From the underdog to a successful champion, 80% of people can't name these sports movies from a screenshot. Can you?

In the United States, there's a host of genres to choose from when attending the movies. Many people love to indulge in action, adventure, comedy, drama, romance, and sci-fi. Even within these dramas, you'd find a series of films that are dedicated to one thing. Pitch Perfect is a popular film dedicated to singing. The Channing Tatum/Jenna Dewan film, Step Up, is considered a classic in dance movies. While singing and dancing have their own group of films, there's another group that is reserved for sports.

Americans highly prefer football, baseball, and basketball to ice hockey, tennis, and golf. This is why you could probably list a movie for the first three sports easier than the latter three. Although football, baseball, and basketball dominate in the world of sports films, you'll find a hand full of boxing and soccer films. Within every sports film you see, some might be obscure but others might be instantly recognizable. Could you recognize Hilary Swank with two boxing gloves? What about Tom Hanks holding a baseball bat next to Madonna? We've featured some of the biggest sports films to ever hit the big screen. Now it's up to you to see if you can knock this quiz out of the park! Step up to the plate!

This inspirational sports film tells the true story of the 1980 US Olympic hockey team's journey to dethrone then-undefeated Russia, and Herb Brooks, the coach who got them there. "Miracle" was put out by Walt Disney Pictures, so when the adrenaline isn't pumping, it's pretty much guaranteed to tug on the old heart strings.

"Brian's Song" tells the true story of a Caucasian professional football player, Brian Piccolo's unbreakable friendship with fellow young, gifted and African-American Chicago Bears teammate, Gayle Sayers -- a friendship that tore through racial barriers that were still present in the late 1960s. If that's not enough inspiration to jerk the tears from your eyes... well, no spoilers here... watch for yourself!

"Field of Dreams" was filmed in Dyersville, Iowa, where an actual Field of Dreams was created for the film. That baseball diamond became a landmark and tourist attraction in the small town. Even now, more than 25 years later, the place is still cherished by many, near and far.

The making of "Rocky" is an underdog story in itself. Sylvester Stallone, who wrote the screenplay as well as starred in the film, was an unknown actor at the time, and the producers wanted a big name in the lead role. It's a good thing Stallone stuck to his guns and got the film made his way--it won three Academy Awards and went on to be an extremely successful seven-movie franchise!

Disney's at it again with this one! There are some who lived the real-life story about a football team breaking racial barriers and inspiring change with its racially integrated squad in 1971. While some parts of the movie may or may not be totally true, "Remember the Titans" sure does a bang-up job of painting a picture of what it looks like to overcome adversity... together.

"Rudy" is another "based on a true story" film about Dan "Rudy" Ruettiger's personal triumph to become a walk-on at Notre Dame back in the 1970s. However, like many biopics, more than a few minor details were exaggerated in order to increase the drama and add to the overall emotional appeal of the story--hence the phrase "based on." In the case of "Rudy," for better or worse, many of the characters depicted in the film are fictitious composites, made up of many different people's general attitude toward Rudy in real life.

"Million Dollar Baby" is an adaptation of a short story from author F.X. Toole, called "Rope Burns." The controversial feature film was written by Paul Haggis and directed by Clint Eastwood.

Horse jockeys have to be under 115 pounds when they race. For Tobey Maguire, getting skinny and light for the role was a struggle - especially after bulking up for "Spiderman." But the effort was well worth it; "Seabiscuit" was nominated for seven Academy Awards!

This movie just celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2016. Despite heavy friction between director David Anspaugh and leading actor Gene Hackman, the film has gone on to be one of the most beloved sports films of all time!

"The Natural" stars Robert Redford as a baseball player that gets a second chance. As a youngster, he was a promising pitcher who had his career cut short after he suffered a gunshot wound. In his comeback, he finds some hitting prowess using a bat cut from a tree struck by lightning. "The Natural" was directed by Barry Levinson and based on a novel by Bernard Malamud.

2000's "The Legend Of Bagger Vance," directed by Robert Redford, tells the story of Rannulph Junuh (Matt Damon), a golfer who rediscovers his game thanks to his caddy, Bagger Vance (Will Smith). He learns valuable life lessons as well. The movie is based on the 1995 book by Steven Pressfield, "The Legend of Bagger Vance: A Novel of Golf and the Game of Life."

Featuring an all-star cast, including Kevin Costner, Tim Robbins and Susan Sarandon, 1988's "Bull Durham" is a sports romantic comedy. It tells the story of a rookie pitcher, played by Tim Robbins, who is assigned to a veteran catcher, played by Kevin Costner, as he prepares to move from the minor to major leagues. Susan Sarandon plays a love interest for both. "Bull Durham" was directed by Ron Shelton.

With Russell Crowe in the lead role, "Cinderella Man" is the true story of James Braddock, a boxer on a downward spiral as the Great Depression hits the United States. Unable to win a fight, he ends up having to live on public relief. But inside Braddock is a determined heart. He returns to the ring, where the boxing public expect him to be pummeled. Instead, Braddock registers win after win, eventually getting a chance to face Max Baer, the world heavyweight champion. Braddock wins in one of the biggest boxing upsets ever. The movie was directed by Ron Howard.

2005's "Coach Carter" sees Samuel L. Jackson playing basketball coach, Ken Carter. After taking over the coaching of a high school basketball team he once played for, Carter is dismayed at the lack of application the players show to their academic work, as well as their overall disrespect of authority. He draws up a contract with all of them, making them pay attention to their academic work and be more respectful, among other things. When some players breach their contract by failing academically, Carter benches the whole team, much to the dismay of the school and parents alike.

Set in the National Hockey League, The Rocket tells the story of Maurice "The Rocket" Richard, a Canadian hockey player from Quebec. Because the league is dominated by English speaking players, French speakers from Canada are frowned upon and discriminated against - until Richard speaks out. The Rocket was directed by Charles Binamé and stars Roy Dupuis.

Telling the true story of the Marshall University football team, this movie shows how their team recovered following a devastating plane crash that killed players, support staff and fans. After the catastrophe, new coach Jack Lengyel (Matthew McConaughey) not only needs to build a new team but help everyone find the strength to move on.

1944's "National Velvet" stars Mickey Rooney and Elizabeth Taylor. It tells the story of a young woman, determined to enter a horse into the Grand National, the most famous horse race in Britain. To do this, she enlists the help of a former jockey. "National Velvet" won two Oscars.

In "Glory Road," Josh Lucas plays basketball coach Don Haskins, the coach of a girls' high school basketball team. After he is approached to coach a college team in Texas, he jumps at the opportunity, even though they have a small budget. With his wife and children living in a college dorm, Haskins puts together a team that goes on to win the NCAA Championship. Interestingly, the part of Haskins was offered to Ben Affleck, who turned it down due to other commitments.

In 1919, the Chicago White Sox deliberately lost the World Series after taking bribes. This movie tells the story of that incident, as well as how all the players involved were suspended two years later when the truth came out. Not all of them were guilty, however, and George "Buck" Weaver, played by John Cusack, spent the rest of his life trying to clear his name.

"Breaking Away" tells the story of four friends who have recently left high school. One of them, Dave (played by Dennis Christopher), is a brilliant bicycle racer and is consumed with the Italian cycle team. Of course, there is a girl involved as well, and Dave even pretends to be Italian to impress her. The story develops from there. "Breaking Away" won an Oscar for Best Screenplay.

"Invincible," directed by Ericson Core and starring Mark Wahlberg and Greg Kinnear, tells the story of Vince Papale, a Philly bartender who at the age of 30 managed to score a contract with the Philadelphia Eagles. "Invincible" is based on a true story. Interestingly, Papale's children have small parts in the movie.

A golfing movie directed by Bill Paxton, "The Greatest Game Ever Played" tells the story of the 1913 U.S. Open. Here Francis Ouimet, a caddy who in earlier years was never allowed to play the game of golf, comes up again a man he has idolized, 1900 U.S. Open winner Harry Vardon. The movie stars Shia LeBeouf and Stephen Dillane.

A group of down-and-out ice hockey players learn that their team, which hardly has any support in their local town, will fold at the end of the season. But their manager, played by Paul Newman, has other plans. He turns the team into a bunch of bruisers, fighting at every opportunity. Unbelievably, it works and the team starts winning. And it gets even more interesting from there...

A wacky comedy, "Caddyshack," directed by Harold Ramis, stars Chevy Chase, Bill Murray and Rodney Dangerfield. Set at an exclusive golf club, the movie features many different stories, including a greens-keeper, played by Murray, trying to get the better of a troublesome gopher.

This movie from 1955 was directed by the legendary John Ford. It stars Tyrone Power and Maureen O'Hara in the lead roles, as well as Patrick Wayne, son of John Wayne. The film focuses on the story of Irish immigrant Martin "Marty" Maher and his rise through the West Point Military Academy, where he started by washing dishes before moving into the Athletics Department and beyond.

A real heartwarming true story, "Radio" tells the story of a football coach, played by Ed Harris, and his friendship with Radio, who is mentally challenged. Radio is superbly played by Cuba Gooding Jr. and the story itself shows how someone can develop through the love and friendship of another. "Radio" was directed by Michael Tollin.

This 1981 movie has a great cast including Michael Caine, Sylvester Stallone and even Brazilian soccer legend, Pele as well as Bobby Moore and Osvaldo Ardiles, two other soccer greats! The movie is set in a German prison of war camp where Allied soldiers are up against their captors in a game of soccer. Of course, this is just a ruse, as they try to setup an escape. "Victory" was directed by John Huston.

1996's "Tin Cup" stars Kevin Costner, an old golf pro, down on his luck and now working at a driving range. To cut a long story short, he falls for the girlfriend of a successful one-time rival and decides to enter the U.S. Open to try and win her heart. Rene Russo plays Costner love interest in the movie.

Starring Barry Pepper as Roger Maris and Thomas Jane as Mickey Mantle, "61*" is a movie that follows both Mantle and Maris as they attempt to beat Babe Ruth's seasonal home run record in 1961. The movie was directed by Billy Crystal.

"Friday Night Lights," a movie from 2004, follows the fortunes of the Permian High Panthers, a high school football team from the town of Odessa. After they lose their star player right at the beginning of the season, it seems as there is no hope left. But Coach Gaines, played by Billy Bob Thornton, and his players prove that the Panthers can go on. "Friday Night Lights" was directed by Peter Berg and led to a TV series.

Starring Gary Cooper and Teresa Wright, 1942's "Pride of the Yankees" was directed by Sam Wood. It portrays the life story of Lou Gehrig, a baseball player who played 2,130 consecutive games for the Yankees. Unfortunately, a nerve disease that now bears his name put an end to his career. Interestingly, Cooper, who played Gehrig, was not a fan of baseball, had never played the sport or even been to a game before.

The greatest movie about the sport of pool ever made, "The Hustler" stars Paul Newman as "Fast" Eddie Felson, a brash up-and-coming pool player. After challenging and losing to the best player in the States, Minnesota Fats, played by Jackie Gleason, Eddie must rebuild his confidence and love for the game. He does so under the guidance of a brutal new manager, Bert Gordon, played by George C. Scott. Interestingly, the actors all played their own shots during the movie except one, a trick shot that required pool legend Willie Mosconi to pull off.

A look at the interesting world of bull riding, "8 Seconds" is about the life of the 1987 Bull Riding Champion, Lane Frost. It was directed by John G. Avildsen and stars Luke Perry and Stephen Baldwin. Both Perry and Baldwin learned to ride bulls for the movie and managed to do their own stunts as well.

After making a bet with his school team to motivate them to win their championship, a baseball coach has to stay true to his word and try out for Major League Baseball. "The Rookie" is based on a true story and stars Dennis Quaid and Rachel Griffiths.

"Chariots of Fire" is a historical drama, released in 1981. It tells the story of two athletes, Eric Liddell and Harold Abrahams, and their build-up to the 1924 Olympics. The movie was nominated for seven Academy Awards and won four. It stars Ben Cross and Ian Charleson.

The sixth movie in the Rocky franchise, "Rocky Balboa" finds the title character coming out of retirement against heavyweight champion Mason "The Line" Dixon. This 2006 film won second place at the Golden Schmoes Awards for Biggest Surprise of the Year. Is that a good thing or not?

A great family movie, "The Sandlot" is about making friends in a new neighborhood. When Scotty Smalls moves into a neighborhood where the kids are baseball mad, he must learn the game to help him fit in. Once he does, there are other things to worry about, including rival teams and the feared "Beast," a baseball-eating dog. "The Sandlot" was directed by David Mickey Evans.

"Major League" is a brilliant comedy, focusing on baseball. It follows the fortunes of the Cleveland Indians, a baseball team purposely put together with average players, has-beens or rookies, as the owner wants them to continue losing so she can move the franchise to another city. Except the players get wind of this and turn their season around! Major League stars Charlie Sheen, Tom Berenger and Corbin Bernsen.

With Denzel Washington starring as Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, this movie tells of his rise to boxing stardom. On the verge of glory, Carter is convicted of three murders. Carter always maintains his innocence, and years later help comes from an outside source. "The Hurricane" was directed by Norman Jewison.

In 1961, Ernie Davis became the first African American to win the Heisman Trophy. "The Express" tells his story in the lead-up to this incredible achievement, plus the prejudice he had to face in his town, on the field and even from his team-mates. His relationship with his coach is a plot point. "The Express" sees Rob Brown and Dennis Quaid in the lead roles.

With World War II in full swing, Major League baseball is canceled throughout America. A women's professional league is started, with scouts sent to all corners of the United States to find players. "A League Of Their Own" tells the story of a few of these players, particularly two sisters, played by Geena Davis and Lori Petty. It also stars Tom Hanks, Madonna and Rosie O'Donnell.

When a professional football player ends up serving time in prison, the warden decides he has the perfect opportunity to stage a match between the guards and the prisoners. And of course, he has ulterior motives. He wants the prisoners taught a lesson. The original 1974 version of "The Longest Yard" features Burt Reynolds and Eddie Albert. The 2005 remake features Adam Sandler, Chris Rock and Burt Reynolds.

This documentary follows two teenage basketball players as they set their sights on a college scholarship and hopefully, a professional career. "Hoop Dreams" was directed by Steve James and was nominated for an Oscar.

Directed by the Farrelly brothers, "Kingpin" sees Woody Harrelson playing Roy Munson, a bowler whose career was ended by injury. He finds a potential new superstar and convinces him to take him on as his coach. There is one problem, however - Ishmael, his new protege is Amish.

Released in 1986 when BMXing had just hit the mainstream, "Rad" follows a young rider, Cru Jones, who is hell bent on winning a BMX race named Helltrack. He puts together an amateur racing team to help him realize his dream. The movie stars Bill Allen and Lori Loughlin and was directed by Hal Needham.

Matthew Modine and Linda Fiorentino star in 1985's "Vision quest." Modine plays Louden Swain, a promising wrestler whose game is thrown out of kilter by the arrival of Carla, who rents a room in his father's home. "Vision Quest" was directed by Harold Becker.

"Jerry Maguire" stars Tom Cruise and Cuba Gooding Jr. Cruise is an sports agent, a smooth talker that always gets what he wants. When he decides to cut down on his clients, he is fired by his firm. Instead, he goes it alone and sets up his own sports agency. "Jerry Maguire" includes the famous line - "SHOW ME THE MONEY!" The movie was directed by Cameron Crowe.

The greatest karate movie of them all? Some would certainly say so. When he moves to a new town, Daniel Russo is picked on by a bunch of bullies. When he is rescued by the caretaker of the building where he lives, Daniel befriends Mr. Miyagi (Pat Morita), who teaches him the art of karate and the discipline of brought from martial arts.

This 1992 movie stars Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson in the lead roles. In the world of street basketball, hustling is common. This movie follows Sidney and Billy, two of the best in the business. They join forces to increase their chances of winning money, except they are their own worst enemies. "White Men Can't Jump" was directed by Ron Shelton.

The original 1976 version of "The Bad News Bears" stars Walter Matthau and Tatum O'Neal. The classic underdog story was remade in 2005, with Billy Bob Thornton as the little league coach who takes over a team of no-hopers on the verge of being ejected from their league.

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