Quiz: Breakfast Quiz
Topics
Breakfast Quiz
By: Staff
Image: refer to hsw

About This Quiz

Eating a morning meal helps keep us healthy, both mentally and physically. But other than the fact that you're supposed to eat breakfast, what else do you know about it? Take this quiz to test your eggspertise. (Oh, come on -- we simply couldn't pass up that pun!)

1.0 of 10
How many American adults eat a daily breakfast?

An estimated 54 percent of adults younger than age 55 eat breakfast every day. The older we are, the more likely we are to eat breakfast, finds a poll conducted by ABC News: While only 54 percent of adults under the age of 55 eat breakfast, 83 percent of seniors do.

2.0 of 10
What percentage of teens regularly skips breakfast?

More than half of male adolescents regularly skip breakfast, estimates the American Dietetic Association. And adolescent girls have an even worse record, with more than two-thirds routinely missing the meal.

3.0 of 10
Which of the following popular fast-food breakfast options has the fewest calories?

One Egg McMuffin has 300 calories, making it a caloric catch when you compare it to the others on the list. Both Denny's Moon's Over My Hammy and the Carl's Jr. Loaded Breakfast Burrito pack in 780 and 820 calories, respectively. The Jumbo Rooty Tooty Fresh 'N Fruity is a breakfast bomb, totaling 1,400 calories.

4.0 of 10
What is the most popular breakfast food among American adults?

According to an ABC News poll, cold cereal is the number one breakfast food among those Americans who actually eat breakfast. To be sure your breakfast cereal is good for you, not just a sugar delivery system, look for whole grains on the ingredients list, preferably as the first ingredient, and no less than 3 grams of fiber per serving.

5.0 of 10
Fact or fiction: Eating breakfast helps you lose weight.

Multiple studies show that eating a healthy breakfast -- or any breakfast at all, when compared to skipping the meal -- may help people lose weight and keep the weight off. While skipping meals may seem like an easy way to cut calories, without a morning meal, many people tend to carb-load and binge eat late in the day.

6.0 of 10
What percent of American adults have eaten cold pizza for breakfast?

According to a poll conducted by ABC News, nearly 40 percent of Americans have eaten cold pizza for breakfast. Cold pizza, while not a breakfast you'd want to eat every day, is still a good choice over a doughnut or other sugary morning starters.

7.0 of 10
Fact or fiction: All oatmeal is nutritionally the same.

Steel-cut oats are a great source of whole grains, and have shown to be beneficial in preventing heart disease, certain cancers and Type 2 diabetes while also reducing cholesterol levels and the risk of hypertension. Instant oatmeal is also a whole grain but it's been processed, making it less healthy than the steel-cut variety, but it's still a good breakfast option. And if you're an instant oatmeal fan or thinking of adding it to your diet, look for instant oatmeal that is low in sugar and sodium.

8.0 of 10
Which of the following is not a common breakfast food in Japan?

Kimchi is a spicy fermented cabbage dish that's popular in Korea. Traditional Korean breakfasts also commonly include tofu, pickled vegetables, bolgogi (grilled steak), red-bean soup and pajyong (savory pancakes served with vegetables).

9.0 of 10
Who is typically credited with introducing the doughnut to the world?

While no one can be 100 percent sure, most historians agree that the first doughnut recipe dates back to the mid-19th century and should be credited to the Dutch, who fried sweet balls of dough in pork fat, known as olykoeks (oily cakes).

10.0 of 10
When did the School Breakfast Program become a permanent program in schools across America?

The School Breakfast Program began as an experimental program in 1966 and became permanent in public schools and non-profit childcare institutions in 1975. In 2007, more than 10 million kids participated in the program, according to the USDA, up from 1.8 million participants in 1975.

Receive a hint after watching this short video from our sponsors.
quit
hint:
continue