Quiz: Can You Identify These Famous Moments in Baseball History?
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Can You Identify These Famous Moments in Baseball History?
By: Olivia Cantor
Image: ABC/MLB

About This Quiz

Baseball is indeed still America's pastime. The classic ballgame has been a part of the American culture for many decades now. And perhaps it will remain as well-liked in the future like how it was so well-liked in the past.

What's not to love with this game? There are so many moments in an American's life that can be connected to baseball. Both little boys and girls play this sport in the sandlots of their youth. There were even so many movies made about the sport, the players, the dreaming of playing it, or the accidental heroes that play this sport. Hollywood has practically immortalized every aspect there is about this sport on the silver screen. And they continue to do so, since this sport is still so well-loved and appreciated by North American culture, and the global pop culture as well.

But of course, there are so many historical moments in this sport that remains unforgettable for one reason or another. Think you can recall a lot of these moments that happened over the decades? Try to guess based on these images, okay?

Play ball!

The legendary Babe Ruth pointed towards the direction as to where he will hit the ball for his next home run, which he achieved. He did this during the 1932 World Series.

During the 1954 World Series, Willie Mays made one of the greatest catches of all time. He played for the New York Giants.

It was U.S. President William Howard Taft who started the tradition of a president throwing the first pitch. He did it first in 1910.

The Los Angeles Dodgers helped break the color barrier in the U.S. when they signed up Jackie Robinson. He started playing in 1947 and became a legend for his overall sportsmanship.

This was the time when legendary Mickey Mantle injured his knee while still a rookie. It was during the 1951 World Series.

The 1951 home run made by New York Giants' Bobby Thomson was labeled as "The Shot Heard Round The World" because of its highly dramatic impact on the game. Because of this home run, their team won the National League pennant against the Brooklyn Dodgers.

The New York Yankees' Yogi Berra marked his 10th World Series win in this historic 1962 game. They defeated the San Francisco Giants back then.

This farewell speech made by Lou Gehrig in 1939 became one of the most emotional moments in baseball history. The legend announced his early retirement because of being diagnosed with a disease called ALS, later renamed as Lou Gehrig's Disease.

This moment marked the very first time the New York Yankees won the World Series. It was in 1923.

It was in 1941 when legendary player Joe DiMaggio made a flawless hitting record. He had a hitting streak in 56 consecutive games.

Hammerin' Hank Aaron hit his 715th home run in 1974. By doing so, he broke Babe Ruth's previously unbreakable 714 home runs until that moment.

Bill Mazeroski's legendary Game 79th inning walk-off home run won the World Series for the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1960. They defeated the New York Yankees.

The New York Mets dramatically won their very first World Series title back in 1969. They defeated the Baltimore Orioles that year.

It was in 1977 that Reggie Jackson became known as Mr. October of baseball history. That was due to his great game that year, culminating in that fateful October when he won the World Series for his team, the New York Yankees.

The Baltimore Orioles' Cal Ripken Jr. was the one who broke New York Yankees Lou Gehrig's record of playing in consecutive games. Gehrig's record was 2,130, which Ripken surpassed on September 1995.

The 1986 World Series win was clinched by the New York Mets, and the loss of the Boston Red Sox was unfortunately attributed to Bill Buckner's booboo of not being able to stop a ground ball, which cost his team the game. Despite this one mishap, the man played a great game overall in his career.

The Pittsburgh Pirates' Robert Clemente set an all-time record when he made his 3,000th hit back in 1972. It's just too bad that he died months later in a plane crash.

New York Yankees pitcher Don Larsen pitched a perfect game during the 1956 World Series. This was, and still is, a rare feat, that's why he is such a legend in this sport.

The unforgettable Black Sox Scandal of 1919 involved eight Chicago White Sox players throwing the World Series so their opponent could win. In return, the game fixer would pay them money for losing the game on purpose, resulting in a huge controversy and the banishment of the players involved from professional baseball.

Cy Young, pitching for the Boston Rustlers, won his 511th game in 1911. An award is actually named after him - that's how great he became!

Boston Red Sox's Carlton Fisk hit a legendary home here during the World Series games of 1975. It became one of the most famous home runs in the history of the sport.

Oh, the things players have to do to clinch a win. This was what Jim Edmonds did in 1997 - he made a legendary dive for that great catch.

The New York Yankees' Derek Jeter is one of the modern legends of this sport. He cemented this claim when he made his 3,000th hit back in 2011.

Legendary baseball man Ty Cobb held the record of having 4,192 career hits. But Pete Rose surpassed that in 1985, and ended up having 4,256 career hits.

If Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier for African-Americans to become the first black baseball player in the Major Leagues, Satchel Paige also did that by becoming the first black pitcher to join the leagues. He was also the oldest rookie then, clocking in at age 42 when he joined.

All-star games were unheard of prior to 1933. So this very first of its kind happened in 1933, and became a tradition ever since.

While pitching for the Arizona Diamondbacks back in 2001, Randy Johnson got accidentally immortalized for hitting a bird with his fast pitch. Feathers flew out, and of course, the unfortunate bird died - and it's all recorded in TV glory.

A 1935 game between the Cincinnati Reds and the Philadelphia Phillies became the first night game ever played in the league. It's interesting how such moves are common these days already.

Even sportsmen behave without sportsmanlike qualities sometimes. This is what happened when a brawl between Chicago White Sox's Robin Ventura and Texas Rangers' Nolan Ryan took place in 1993.

While playing for the Boston Red Sox, Dave Roberts was tagged as a hero of 2004 when he stole second base during the American League Championship Series. That monumental move happened during Game 4.

The Minnesota Twins' Kirby Puckett performed so well in the 1991 World Series that he became unforgettable for fans that year. He made an incredible catch and also hit an incredible home run.

Baseball fans were saddened when a work stoppage hit the MLB during the third quarter of 1994. The workers' strike suspended the games well until the early part of the second quarter of 1995.

Rick Monday, playing for the Chicago Cubs in 1976, did a non-game-related action at the stadium during this moment - he stopped protesters from burning the American flag. It was a tense time for American politics, and it spilled over American sports, of course.

Jose Canseco was the first player ever to enter the 40-40 Club of baseball history. This means a batter must have had 40 home runs achieved and must have stolen 40 bases in one season alone. He accomplished this feat in 1988.

The Arizona Diamondbacks won the 2001 World Series against the New York Yankees. AZ's Luis Gonzalez was the one who made the game-changing hit that won for them their very first World Series title.

Toronto Blue Jays player Joe Carter hit the defining home run in 1993. That clinched for them the World Series title of the year.

New York Yankees player Aaron Boone made a great home run in the American League Championship Series of 2003. The feat is recorded as one of baseball's great moments.

When Kevin Mitchell caught a ball using his bare hand instead of the gloved one, that made a mark in baseball history. This feat happened in April 1989.

Did you know that a woman tried to play major league baseball back in 1931? That feat was earned by minor league pitcher Jackie Mitchell, sadly the first and the last time a woman was allowed to play with the men - just because she struck out the likes of Lou Gehrig and Babe Ruth.

The year 1939 is marked as the first time that a baseball game was televised on American airwaves. Nowadays, that looks so ordinary, so let's pay our respects to this monumental event!

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