Can You Match the Coin to the Country?

WORLD

By: Lauren Lubas

6 Min Quiz

These ruble coins are from what country?

While Russian banknotes or bills are known as rubles or roubles, coins are available in rubles and kopeks. One ruble is equal to 100 kopeks. The ruble is one of the oldest national currencies.

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The buffalo nickel is no longer in production, but which country minted it?

The American buffalo nickel or Indian head nickel was produced from 1913 to 1938. While you can still find some in circulation today, they are becoming rare. Those that were in circulation often show quite a bit of wear.

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Can you name the country that has this Elizabeth II coin?

If you were wondering why Canada would have Queen Elizabeth II on their money, it is important to remember Canada's history with Great Britain. Although the queen is on their money, Canadians do not give the royal family any money, unless the queen is performing duties on behalf of Canada.

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This intricately designed penny can be found where?

This one-cent piece from the Bahamas has very detailed starfish on the back and shows off quite a bit of mastery in the minting process. Though it has a low monetary value, it is still beautiful.

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Do you know where this 1-cent piece with a hummingbird on it comes from?

Many countries show off the flora and fauna of their land on their coins — it's a great way to represent the country. Trinidad and Tobago is known as the "Land of the Hummingbirds."

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Can you guess where this coin (bottom right) with an eagle and the sun is from?

If you aren't sure where to find Kyrgyzstan on a map, you can find it on the border of China, next to Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. It is one of the smaller of the -stan countries. The coins in this country are known as tiyin.

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This vatu is from which country?

Unlike most countries, Vanuatu's sole currency is the vatu, with no smaller denomination for coins. Since 2011, 1- and 2-vatu coins are no longer minted. The smallest vatu coin is valued at 5, and the largest at 100. The lowest denomination of paper notes currently available is 200 vatu.

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Which country has a two-dollar coin with a bear on it?

With so much flora and fauna seen on coins around the world, it should be no surprise that Canada has an image of a bear on one of its coins. After all, bears are abundant in the Canadian woods.

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What country does this 50-att piece come from?

The 50-att piece from Laos has the country's coat of arms on the front. The reverse side features a fish, along with two palm trees. In Laos, 1 kip equals 100 att, but Laos does not mint coins in the present day.

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This coin is worth 5 kurus. What country does it come from?

The majority of the modern coins used in Turkey were first minted in 2008 and issued to the public for circulation in 2009. The 5-kurus piece features a star and crescent and a tree of life.

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Do you know where this two-cent piece that looks a little like a nickel is from?

The coin you see here is referred to as a 2-centavos piece. It is worth 2 cents in Bolivian currency. Certain mints of these coins are highly collectible. In Bolivia, 100 centavos equal 1 boliviano.

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A 10-cent fils (left) with a palm tree on the back comes from which country?

The dinar is the currency of Bahrain, and 1 dinar equals 1,000 fils. An interesting fact about Bahraini coins (or fils) is that they have dates from both the Gregorian and Islamic calendars. Fils are still in circulation, and they are made of mixed metals.

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Can you tell us which country created these francs?

A Burundi single franc is a simple coin made from aluminum. They have been produced since 1968, with varying designs, and they are only one millimeter thick with a reeded edge. Other denominations include 5-, 10- and 50-franc coins.

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Do you know where this luma comes from?

Though Armenian coinage seems simple, it is rather standardized. Each coin has the Armenian coat of arms on the top side and the value of the coin on the back. These coins are minted in different colors and weights to help people tell them apart.

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This might be a tough one. This gold coin with an image of King George III on one side is from which country?

Gold guinea coins, minted between 1663 and 1814, had images of royals stamped on them. The coins themselves were made of 0.91 gold purity and weighed over eight grams. These coins were used to pay professional fees, not for everyday transactions.

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Where do these intricate peso coins come from?

Pesos are found throughout Mexico. However, for those living in the American Southwest, you may notice that you get pesos here and there from travelers. It is rare to see an American business accepting this form of currency, but it does get mixed in quite often.

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These seven-sided coins show off some intricate markings. Do you know where they come from?

If you travel to Batswana, you will notice that they have two different types of coins: the thebe and the pula. The country's paper currency is the pula, and 1 pula is worth 100 thebe. The unique shape of some Batswana coins helps the country avoid counterfeiting.

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In which country would you find these sene coins?

It wasn't until 1967 that Samoa took on its own currency, five years after gaining independence from New Zealand. One tala is equal to 100 sene. These days, their sene coins feature local plants and crops.

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Would you know where to find this uniquely-shaped piece that is worth 25 paise at face value?

The coins of India come in a variety of shapes and sizes — some with scalloped edges, some with rounded-off corners, all with beautiful engraving. Since 2011, coins valued at 25 paise and below have been demonetized. The coin shown here commemorates the 1982 Asian Games.

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Which country does this 5-centimos coin come from?

The centimos from Peru is one of the most interesting looking coins on our list. It has an eight-sided indent that holds the image on either side of the coin. Because 1- and 5-centimos coins are rarely used, most cash transactions in Peru are rounded up or down.

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We might stump you with this older coin. In which country might you find this 20-centimes piece?

Haiti had many different coins in the 1800s and 1900s, known as centimes. From 1908 to 1949, no centime or gourde coins were produced, but today shoppers can spend coins valued at 50 centimes, 1 gourde and 5 gourdes.

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Where might you find the lipa coin pictured here?

Croatian coins are made with smooth surfaces that have intricate details in specific areas. For example, the 50-lipa coin has a braided rope on the alternate side with thin lines around it.

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This may look like a plain coin, but can you tell us what country it's from?

This one is tricky! Slovenia is now part of the EU, meaning that they circulate euro coins. The coin pictured here is a 2-tolar coin, featuring an elegant barn swallow, which was issued between 1993 and 2007.

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These ban coins come from which Eastern European country?

Although these are rather plain-looking coins, Romanian currency doesn't necessarily need to be intricate. One ban is the lowest denomination within the Romanian currency exchange. It is to the leu what a penny is to a dollar in the United States.

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Where does this oddly-shaped coin come from?

You might think that Swaziland is a made-up place, but it's actually a small kingdom that is located in southern Africa. It is completely landlocked, and it's only about the size of New Jersey — a little smaller, actually. Their currency is the lilangeni, with a subunit called a cent.

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This country has a guardian spirit and a large fish on their 1-krona coin. Do you know the name of the country?

On one side of this 1-krona coin, you will see an image of a guardian spirit of Iceland; on the other, a codfish. Other denominations feature all four guardian spirits of Iceland.

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At first look, this coin might take on characteristics of a sand dollar. What country is it from?

Jamaica is another country that has coins of various interesting shapes. These are made from single or mixed metals as well. The $10 coin shown here has an image of George William Gordon, a Jamaican politician and businessman.

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Do you know where this 5-colones piece comes from?

The colon in Costa Rica is named in honor of Christopher Columbus. The 5-colones coin has been made from aluminum since 2012, but it was once made out of chrome steel and then bronze throughout the 1990s.

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In which country will you find a tetri that looks like this?

Beginning in 1995, Georgia began creating coins known as tetri. One lari is equal to 100 tetri. Lari are available as coins and banknotes; tetri are available only as coins.

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Can you tell us where you'd find this 5-sen piece?

Malaysian money isn't as strong as you might think. One ringgit is equal to only about one-quarter of one American dollar in 2019. One ringgit is equal to 100 sen. The word "ringgit" comes from a word that meant "jagged," for the jagged edges on 17th-century Spanish coins.

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A 1-cent euro with this leafy design on the front comes from which country?

Euro notes and coins didn't reach circulation until 2002, with the cooperation of many European countries. All euro coins have same design on the back (reverse), based on the denomination, but the front (obverse) varies from country to country, and also varies by denomination. All designs must have twelve stars encircling the design on the obverse.

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Where would you find this coin with an aardvark on it?

The currency of Zambia is the kwacha, which is subdivided into 100 ngwee. Aardvarks, which are honored on Zambian coins along with other native animals, are nocturnal insectivores.

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All right, here's the toughest one of all. Can you guess what island country in Oceania this coin is from?

Don't feel bad if you've never heard of Kiribati. It's a small island country near where the Indian Ocean meets the Pacific Ocean. This nickel features a tokay gecko, but good luck finding this coin when you visit Kiribati. The country no longer mints its own coins, preferring to use Australian coinage.

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A lion roars on the coins from which country?

Ethiopia definitely has some of the most beautiful coins in the world, especially for nature lovers. The currency of the country is called the birr, with a subunit called the santim. Prior to 1931, Ethiopia was known as Abyssinia.

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Do you know where this coin with a hole in it comes from?

A lot of East Asian money is considered ornamental in the West. Additionally, some of this money is considered to be good luck. However, those who live in Japan simply see these coins as a way to make purchases, obviously. The coin shown here is worth 50 yen.

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What country has coins that are known as cedi?

Ghana's 1-cedi piece has multiple edges and a cowry shell on it. It is made of brass. Other coins in the modern set, called pesewas, are made of copper and nickel or bronze.

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Do you know where these senti pieces came from, before they were replaced by the euro?

In the early 2000s, many coins were replaced by the euro. This means that a lot of these coins are no longer in circulation. Estonia, as a part of the European Union, gave up their senti coins to have a stronger currency.

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Do you know where this stotinki comes from?

Bulgarian coins are known as stotinki, while their paper money is called the lev. One lev is equal to 100 stotinki. The stotinki coins range from 1 to 50, with increments of 2, 5, 10 and 20. Bulgaria is on a "waiting list" to switch over to the euro.

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Can you name the African country where you can find these coins, including one that has peanuts on it?

The Republic of Gambia is a small county, located in West Africa. It is almost completely surrounded by another country, Senegal. Gambia's paper currency is the dalasi, with smaller units called bututs.

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Where might you find coins that look like these?

The currency that you find in China is known as renminbi, or "people's money." The primary denomination is the yuan, and the jiao is worth one-tenth of a yuan.

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Image: Alicia Llop / Moment / Getty Images

About This Quiz

It's not something that we think about often. When we pay for something in cash and we get a fist full of change, we generally just shove it in our pockets or throw it into the bottoms of our purses. We rarely take the time to look at coins, check their dates and see if they have any additional value over what is printed on their faces. Coins have become a burden to some — they can get heavy, and most places don't take more than a few dollars' worth. 

However, for coin collectors and those interested in the little metal objects, coins hold a whole new opportunity. They are interesting works of art, and they give us a sense that they have been somewhere. Each country chooses its own designs, shapes and materials to create the unique coins that mark who they are and what their money is worth. Do you think you could recognize these coins if we showed you some pictures?

Think about this: before you had an eWallet and long before the dollar bill was invented, many cultures and civilizations traded precious metals for goods and services. Coins have been found and documented from as early as 600 BCE. So, if you think you have what it takes to identify these coins, take this quiz to see just how good you are.

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