Can You Pass This English Exam for Non-Native Speakers?

By: Talin Vartanian

Which of the following is an adjective?

The correct answer is thoughtful. An adjective is used to describe an object or a person, so you could say "He is very thoughtful."

Can you spot which sentence has a spelling error?

The sentence with the spelling error is "Los Angeles is going to be hott tomorrow." The word "hott" is actually spelled as just "hot."

Which of these contractions is incorrectly used?

The right answer is as follows: "You doesn't have to cook tonight." "Doesn't" is the incorrect contraction, which should be replaced with "don't." Therefore, the sentence should read as, "You don't have to cook tonight."

Which of these sentences doesn't need a question mark at the end?

"I need some apples from the store?" doesn't need that question mark at the end, since it's a statement and not a question. Sentences that involve a who, what or how at the beginning always needs a question mark at the end.

Which of these sentences uses "you're" correctly?

The right answer is "You're an intelligent person," because it reads as "You are an intelligent person." The rest of the answers are not grammatically correct.

Which of the following is a verb?

"Begin" would be the correct answer in this question, since it's a type of action. The rest of the answers are adjectives.

Which of these sentences uses a past tense verb correctly?

The right answer is "The dog bit my arm." The other answers are not grammatically correct. For example, "Tom broken the necklace" should actually be "Tom broke the necklace."

Which of these is the past tense of "Choose?"

The past tense of "choose" is "chose." You could also say, "Mark was chosen to be the class president."

Which of the following is the present tense of "Drew?"

The present tense of "drew" is "draw." For example, "I'm going to draw a picture for you."

Which of these sentences does not use an adjective correctly?

The right answer is "Thankful was Tom for the food." It should actually read as "Tom was thankful for the food."

Which of the following is not a noun?

"Stormy" is not a noun, it's an adjective. A noun is a person, place or thing, and an adjective is used to describe traits of people or objects.

What is the correct sentence in this list?

The correct answer is "It's raining today." "It's" is a contraction for "It is," so the sentence is actually "It is raining today."

One of these words is not spelled correctly. Can you guess which one it is?

"Cemetary" is spelled incorrectly in this question. It should actually be "cemetery," as the "e" should replace the "a."

"Gotta" is a contraction for...?

The correct answer is "got to." Another example would be, "She's gotta go to the store tomorrow."

"My car" is considered to be a ...

The correct answer is "possessive noun." This type of noun refers to someone's possessions, such as "my car" or "Sarah's laptop."

Which of these sentences is not correct?

The sentence "She haven't been back home in a while" should actually read as "She hasn't been back home in a while." "Hasn't" is a contraction for "has not."

Fill in the missing word: "Jack _____ go to school this morning."

"Didn't" is the right answer, which is a contraction of "did not." The sentence should then read as, "Jack didn't go to school this morning."

Where should the apostrophe go in "Shouldve?"

The right answer is "should've." Should've is a contraction of "should have," and the apostrophe goes before the "ve" part (which denotes "have.")

Fill in the missing word: "The news said it's ________ to rain tomorrow."

The correct answer is "going." Thus, the sentence should read as, "The news said it's going to rain tomorrow."

Which of these words is spelled correctly?

"Calendar" is spelled correctly in this context. Many individuals spell it as "calender," but there's supposed to be an "a" that replaces the "e" at the end.

Which of these sentences is correct?

The correct answer is as follows: "I want to go over there when I'm finished here," because "there" denotes a place or location. "They're" means "they are," and "their" refers to an object or someone's possession.

Which of these nouns is not a compound noun?

History is not a compound noun. A compound noun combines two or more words together, like "railroad" or "airport."

Which of the following is not a conjunction?

"Cut" is not a conjunction, it's a verb. A conjunction helps to link and connect sentences together to make them sound coherent.

Which of these sentences uses an ellipses correctly?

An ellipses is used for a wide variety of sentences, such as denoting a hesitating thought. In this case, "I have a secret to tell you ... actually, I changed my mind" is the right answer.

Fill in the missing word: "I ______ to the store two days ago."

The correct answer is "went." The sentence should read as "I went to the store two days ago."

Which of these sentences is correct in terms of punctuation?

The correct answer is as follows: "It really didn't matter to me (but in reality, it did)." If the entire sentence is in parentheses, the period goes inside of the parentheses. Both "Did you want to hang out later!" and "What's your name again;" need a question mark at the end.

How do you spell "Caribean?"

The correct answer is "Caribbean." Many individuals spell this word as "Carribean."

Which of these words is a collective noun?

A collective noun denotes many things or items into one word. An "audience" of people is a collective noun because it denotes many people.

All of these sentences have errors except one. Which is it?

The correct answer is "I've been seeing Tom lately." The rest of the answers have grammatical errors ("eat" should be "ate," "blow" should be "blew" and the period should go inside the quotation marks, not outside them).

Which of these sentences uses "than" correctly?

The correct answer is "I'm taller than my mom," because this sentence compares two different heights. The other sentences should use the word "then."

Which of the following is not a personal pronoun?

"What" is not a personal pronoun, it's a subjective one. For example, "What time are you going to school tomorrow?"

Which of these sentences is correct?

The right answer is "I need apples and oranges, too." "And" is a conjunction that properly connects apples and oranges together in this sentence.

What is the plural form of "hero?"

The correct answer is "heroes," which is the plural form of "hero." For example, "I have many heroes I look up to."

What is the singular form of "series?"

"Series" is a great example of a word that stays the same in both plural and singular forms. For example, "Have you finished the Harry Potter book series?"

Can you spot the correct sentence?

"My cat has nine lives" is the correct answer for this question. "Lives" is the plural form of "life."

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Image: Getty Images / Cultura / Peter Muller

About This Quiz

If you're a non-native English speaker, you'll have loads of fun taking our English quiz, which is designed to test your knowledge on everything involving grammar, spelling and more! For now, let's do a couple of warm-up exercises to help you get ready for this quiz!

Some questions will ask you to spell a certain word correctly. For example, what is the correct spelling of the word "rythm?" Is it rythmm, rhythym, rhythm or rhyythm? The correct answer is rhythm!

Other questions will ask you to identify the grammatical error in a sentence. For example, can you spot the error in this sentence: "My watch is all wrong today?" The error involves the punctuation at the end, as a period or an exclamation mark should be used instead of a question mark. Here's another example, "My cat isnt' being very nice to me today." The error involves the word "isnt'," as the apostrophe should go before the "t" to spell "isn't."

Whether you're a master of the English language or a complete beginner, we think you'll learn a thing or two by taking this quiz! And if you ever get stuck, be sure to click on the provided hints for a helping hand! Impress your friends and family by scoring a 90% right now!

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