Can You Name All These Famous MLB Players From The 90s?

By: Robin Tyler
Image: MLB

About This Quiz

Baseball in the 1990s was indeed historic in America's much-loved game.

With more and more money coming into the sport, more games shown on television, and attendances at stadiums sky-rocketing, the sport was one of the most popular in America. 

The decade also saw a number of firsts. In 1997, interleague play was allowed for the first time, while in 1994, the World Series didn't happen because of a massive strike by the players. That was the first time in 91 years that baseball's grand finale didn't take place. 

The 1990s are also remembered for a number of exciting moments. For example, in 1998, two massive hitters went neck and neck to try to beat Roger Maris' home run mark of 61 in a season. Do you remember who they were?

The 1990s will also be remembered as the decade in which money bought success. Well, that was certainly the formula used by the New York Yankees.

A team like the Atlanta Braves, who made eight out of nine playoffs, were probably the team of the decade. Yet they only had one World Series to show for their efforts.

The real stars were the players and in this quiz, we want to see how many of them you remember.

Good luck!

'The Iron Man,' Carl Ripken Jr., holds the record for the most consecutive games played in Major League Baseball (2,632). He played for only one team, the Baltimore Orioles, for 20 seasons as either a shortstop or third baseman. Ripken Jr. was an All-Star 19 times and won the World Series once.

Although a steroids scandal rocked his career, Barry Bonds holds the record for the most home runs hit in the MLB (762, including a record 72 home runs in a single season). He played for both the Pittsburgh Pirates and the San Fransisco Giants. His career spanned more than 20 years, from 1986 to 2007.

Mark McGwire smashed 405 homers during the 1990s, mostly for the Oakland Athletics but also for the St. Louis Cardinals. McGwire was an eight-time All-Star.

Ken Griffey Jr. spent 21 years playing in the MLB, most of them with the Seattle Mariners and Cincinnati Reds. 'Junior' never won a World Series but was named on All-Star teams 13 times. He hit 630 home runs in his career.

A great defensive catcher, Ivan Rodriquez represented the Texas Rangers from 1991 to 1999. During that time, he scored 649 runs, hit 144 home runs, was an eight-time All-Star, and Gold Glove winner.

During his career with the Cubs, one of a number of baseball franchises for which he played, Sammy Sosa hit 545 home runs between 1992 and 2004. Incredible!

A four-time All-Star, Edgar Martinez contributed 854 runs to the Mariners in the 1990s. Incredibly consistent, Martinez was in the Top 10 in batting average on seven occasions.

A two-time World Champion, Roberto Alomar played for the Padres, Blue Jays, Orioles and Indians during the 1990s. He was the MVP in 1992, helping the Blue Jays win the World Series.

Many remember Randy Johnson for the mullet he sported for much of the 1990s. A pitcher with the Mariners for much of the decade, Johnson also played for the Astros and Diamondbacks during that time. Johnson was a six-time All-Star during the '90s.

One of MLB's greatest power-hitters, Jose Canseco played for a number of franchises during the 1990s, including the Athletics (twice), Red Sox, White Sox, Blue Jays, and Devil Rays. He won numerous accolades during the decade, including three Silver Slugger Awards, inclusion in three All-Star teams and in 1991, he was MLB's home run leader.

During the 1990s, Paul O'Neil represented both the Reds and the Yankees. Often overlooked, he was a wonderful performer and finished in the Top 10 batting averages three times during the decade. He was also a member of the World Series-winning team on four occasions

Incredibly versatile, Craig Biggio played in three different positions for the Houston Astros from 1990 to 1999. He also contributed 1,042 runs and was a seven-time All-Star.

Kenny Lofton moved around during the 1990s, representing the Astros, Indians (two stints) and the Braves. Incredibly fast, Lofton was one of the best when it came to stealing bases. He made the All-Star team on six occasions in the 1990s.

Although he played for the Angels and the Brewers, Dante Bichette spent most of the '90s playing for the Colorado Rockies. There he contributed 795 runs and 236 home runs, making the All-Star team on four occasions.

A Red for the entire decade of the '90s, many pundits think Barry Larkin was the best shortstop in the game at the time. The fact that he made the All-Star team on eight occasions would tend to back that up. Larkin contributed 834 runs to the Reds during in the 1990s.

The Blue Jays, Padres, Braves and Devil Rays all called on the services of Fred McGriff during the 1990s. A four-time All-Star, McGriff won the World Series with the Braves in 1995. He smashed 300 homers and contributed 837 runs during the decade.

The Red Sox were Mo Vaughn's main team for the duration of the 1990s, although he also played for the Angels in 1999. Vaughn contributed 691 runs and 263 home runs to his team's cause during the decade. He made the All-Star team on three occasions.

Tony Gwynn only played for one team during the 1990s, the San Diego Padres. A clean hitter, Gwynn made every All-Star team in the 1990s. In 1994, he had a batting average of .384!

A Yankee from 1991 to 1999, Bernie Williams was a great all-rounder who helped the Yankees to three World Series titles. He contributed 754 runs and 151 home runs to their cause.

Rafael Palmeiro played for both the Rangers and the Orioles in the 1990s. He smashed 328 home runs and contributed more than 900 runs to these two franchises. He was also a three-time All-Star.

A seven-time All-Star, Mike Piazza played for the Dodgers, Marlins and Mets during the 1990s. Piazza was one of the best hitting catchers of not only the '90s, but all time.

Gary Sheffield made vital batting contributions to four franchises during the 1990s. These included the Brewers, Padres, Marlins, and Dodgers. Sheffield was a five-time All-Star.

A third baseman, Wade Boggs won many awards during the 1990s. These included two Golden Gloves, three Silver Slugger awards and he was an All-Star on seven occasions. Boggs, who played for the Red Sox, Yankees and Devil Rays won the World Series with the Yankees in 1996.

Pedro Martinez played for the Dodgers, Expos, and Red Sox during the 1990s. A pitcher, Martinez won the Cy Young Award in 1997 and 1999, and the pitching Triple Crown (leading the league in wins, strikeouts, and earned run average) in 1999.

Many believe Rickey Henderson to be the greatest MLB leadoff hitter and base stealer ever. By the time the 1990s came around, he had been in the MLB for 11 years and for the rest of the decade, moved between teams often. The American League MVP in 1990, Henderson won a World Series with the Blue Jays in 1993.

Maybe a little undervalued compared to the decade's other big hitters, Juan Gonzalez smashed 339 home runs for the Rangers in the 1990s.

Another excellent '90's slugger, Albert Bell played for the Indians, White Sox, and Orioles. He was a five-time All-Star.

'A-Rod' began his career in 1994 with the Mariners and remained with them for the 1990s. A 14-time All-Star during his career, Alex Rodriquez was the MLB batting champion in 1996 and went on to finish his career with the New York Yankees.

'The Rock' Tim Raines spent most of his time with the White Sox during the 1990s but also played with the Yankees and Athletic during the decade. Many pundits regard Raines as one of Major League Baseball's greatest lead-off hitters. Raines won the World Series twice in the decade, in 1996 and 1998 with the Yankees.

Hideo Nomo was the first Japanese Major League player to move to Major League Baseball in the U.S. He made his debut in 1995 with the Dodgers before moving to the Mets and the Brewers before the decade was out. In 1995, he was the strikeout leader in MLB and was named Rookie of the Year. He also made the All-Star team that year.

A pitcher, Jim Abbott played for four different franchises during the 1990s, including two stints with the Angels and White Sox. Somewhat of a journeyman, Abbott threw a no-hitter for the Yankees against the Indians in 1993.

A first baseman, John Olerud played for the Blue Jays and the Mets during the 1990s. He was the No. 1 batter in the American League in 1993. Olerud was also a World Series winner with the Blue Jays in 1992 and 1993 and an All-Star in 1993.

A Rookie of the Year, Most Valuable Player winner and a four-time All-Star, Jeff Bagwell played for the Astros from 1991 to 1999. From 1994 to 1997, Bagwell led the MLB ing first basemen assists.

Pitcher Tom Glavine spent the whole of the '90s with the Atlanta Braves, winning the World Series in 1995 and making the MLB All-Star team on six occasions. His 164 wins during the 1990's are the second highest total achieved by a pitcher during that time.

A World Series champion in 1995 with the Atlanta Braves, Greg Maddux also played for the Cubs in the early part of the decade. Maddux was also a five-time All-Star during the 1990s. He set a number of records during the decade, such as becoming the first pitcher to win the Cy Young Award for four seasons in a row. His 176 wins during the '90s are the highest achieved by a pitcher during that time.

More than 900 runs batted in and 300 homers is what Frank Thomas contributed to the White Sox during the 1990s. Some numbers those!

By the time the 1990s rolled along, Roger Clemens was a six-year MLB veteran for the Red Sox. He stayed with the franchise until 1996 before moving on to the Blue Jays and then the Yankees. A World Series champion in 1999, Clemens was an All-Star on five occasions during the decade.

Dennis Eckersley, a famed closing pitcher, ended his career in 1998 with the Red Sox after playing for the Athletic and the Cardinals. Although his career was winding down during the decade, he was an MVP in 1992 and an All-Star for three years, from 1990 to 1992.

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