How well do you know your Bill of Rights?

HISTORY

Michael Moraitis

6 Min Quiz

What document is the Bill of Rights part of?

In order to get enough support for the U.S. Constitution, a Bill of Rights became necessary.

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What is the Bill of Rights?

The Bill of Rights was written in order to specifically list protections for individual liberty. It is the first 10 amendments of the U.S. Constitution.

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Who was the main author of the Bill of Rights?

Madison wrote the Bill of Rights after several states expressed concern over the government's power in the U.S. Constitution. It was vital to ratifying the constitution.

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When was the Bill of Rights ratified?

A two-thirds majority of the state legislatures helped ratify the Bill of Rights and it went into effect on December 15, 1791.

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This amendment protects religious liberty and free speech.

Perhaps the most important amendment to the U.S. Constitution, the first amendment gives multiple important freedoms that are absolutely necessary to a free and open society.

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This amendment protects citizens against unreasonable search and seizure.

The main purpose of the Fourth Amendment was to protect a citizen's right to privacy and government intrusion. However, it does not protect from all search and seizure but rather only those done by the federal government and deemed unreasonable under the law.

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This amendment gives the right to due process and prevents double jeopardy.

Thanks to the Fifth Amendment, all U.S. citizens are given a fair trial under the law and cannot be tried for the same crime twice.

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This amendment protects the right to bear arms.

The Second Amendment has been a hot topic in the debate about gun rights and gun control.

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This amendment spells out the rights of accused persons and guarantees the right to a speedy trial.

This amendment prevents undue and oppressive incarceration that could directly affect the accused's trial. It also guarantees a trial by an impartial jury, amongst other things.

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This amendment prevents the quartering of soldiers.

During the Revolutionary War, colonists were forced to house British soldiers whenever necessary. This amendment prevents citizens from quartering soldiers against their will.

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This amendment guarantees the right to a jury trial in civil cases.

This right only extends to federal civil cases, which are rare. Civil cases are usually heard by the states.

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This amendment protects from excessive bail.

The Eighth Amendment prevents judges from giving an unrealistic bail to the accused, thus preventing judgement from being passed down before trial.

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This amendment covers rights that may have been left out of the Bill of Rights.

Just because a right isn't listed in the Bill of Rights, that doesn't mean the federal government can violate it. The Ninth Amendment protects against this.

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This amendment states that any power not given to the federal government is given to the states.

When Madison introduced the 10th Amendment, it was thought to be unnecessary at the time. However, the amendment was passed regardless.

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Which of these states did not ratify the Bill of Rights?

While other states were late to the party, these three states didn't seem to think the Bill of Rights was that important. Talk about short-sighted.

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The term "people" used in the Bill of Rights refers to what group?

It is indeed true that the rights in the Bill of Rights originally extended to just land-owning white males. The other three groups did not get equal rights until later in the nation's history.

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This home state of James Madison was the final vote needed to ratify the Bill of Rights.

Connecticut, Georgia and Massachusetts did not vote to ratify the Bill of Rights.

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How many amendments to the U.S. Constitution were originally proposed by Madison to Congress?

Congress ended up adopting 12 of the 19 amendments and sent them to the states for ratification after.

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James Madison later became which president?

Also one of our founding fathers, Madison was the fourth U.S. president.

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This man from Virginia originally proposed a bill of rights for the U.S. Constitution, but he was shot down.

In 1776, the Virginia Convention adopted Mason's declaration of rights, which was a basis for James Madison's Bill of Rights.

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This amendment is often used in court or during congressional testimony in order to avoid self-incrimination.

You'll often hear, "I invoke my Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination" during a legal proceeding.

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This amendment ensures freedom of the press.

Freedom of the press denies the government the ability to restrict news, creating an open society.

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How many official copies of the Bill of Rights originally existed?

There was one copy for the federal government and one for each of the states.

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Where is the federal government's copy of the Bill of Rights displayed?

The U.S. Constitution and Declaration of Independence are also displayed there. Some states still have their respective copy, while others have lost their copy completely.

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This political party refused to ratify the U.S. Constitution unless a bill of rights was added.

George Mason, Edmund Randolph and Elbridge Gerry led the fight for a bill of rights. They ended up getting their wish.

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The original second amendment of the 12 approved by Congress later became which amendment?

The 27th Amendment covers pay for congressional representatives. It was originally denied by the states as two of 12 amendments that didn't pass.

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In what state was the Bill of Rights drafted?

The federal government was working out of Freedom Hall in New York in 1789. The Declaration of Independence and original U.S. Constitution were both written in Philadelphia.

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The Third Amendment was created in response to this law passed in the 13 colonies by Great Britain.

The Quartering Act of 1765 forced colonists to house British soldiers when needed. It was in effect during the Revolutionary War.

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This amendment protects from "cruel and unusual punishment."

Justice William Brennan adopted four principles to determine cruel and unusual punishment, which were outlined in Furman v. Georgia.

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This 2008 Supreme Court case determined that the Second Amendment protected an individual's right to own and carry a firearm.

The Second Amendment has been challenged repeatedly over the years, but has withstood the test of time.

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It wasn't until this year that Georgia, Massachusetts and Connecticut officially ratified the Bill of Rights.

After over a century, the three states ratified the Bill of Rights. It was also the 150th anniversary of the U.S. Constitution.

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This amendment has been the least contested in the Supreme Court.

A popular amendment at the time of the drafting of the Bill of Rights, the Third Amendment has never truly been challenged.

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President Franklin D. Roosevelt set this date as "Bill of Rights Day" in 1941.

December 15, 1791 is the date the Bill of Rights was officially ratified, thus the reasoning behind using this date for "Bill of Rights Day."

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Miranda v. Arizona was a court case involving which amendment?

This case made it necessary for authorities to make those in custody aware of their Fifth Amendment right to protection against self-incrimination.

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How many of the 14 states ratified the Bill of Rights?

Two-thirds majority was needed to ratify the Bill of Rights, and it was reached when 10 of the 14 states agreed on the document.

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About This Quiz

The Bill of Rights is vitally important to every American, but just how well do you know the ins and outs of your rights? Find out now with this Bill of Rights quiz!

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