The Classic Porsche Quiz: Can You Name Them All?

By: Robin Tyler

Considered the first Porsche ever built, the 64 is a strange looking machine. It was powered by a flat-four engine that produced 50 brake horsepower. Only three were ever built, with one remaining today.

A strange one this, the 930 is also known as the 911 Turbo. It was basically a 911 with a better engine, and upon its introduction in 1975, it was the quickest street-legal car in Germany. Two engine options were available. Early models came with a 3.0-liter turbocharged flat-6 engine that increased to 3.3-liters in 1978. Over 21,000 units of this Porsche were sold.

Designed by Erwin Komenda, the 356 coupe was produced between 1948 and 1963. This was the first vehicle offered by the company and started off its rear-engined, rear-wheel drive design philosophy. Over 76,000 were built, and it is estimated that half still survive.

Marketed between 1976 and 1988, the 924 had a front-engined, rear-wheel drive setup, making it the first Porsche to do so. It was powered by a 2.0 or 2.5-liter water-cooled straight-4 engine, which many criticized for their lackluster performance. Still, over 155,000 units of this entry-level Porsche were sold during that 12-year period.

Released in 1996, the Boxter is a two-door, two-seat roadster. This Porsche was driven by a water-cooled, flat six-cylinder engine. Although not as quick as some of its rivals, it handled beautifully.

A four-door luxury sedan, Porsche introduced the Panamera in 2009. Don’t worry; the German sports car maker isn’t selling out. The Panamera still has that German power that you associate with the brand. In fact, the S model includes a 4.8-liter turbo engine producing 542 brake horsepower.

Another model from Porsche as they branch out into other markets, the Macan is a 4-door compact luxury crossover first introduced in 2014. The top of the range model is driven by a 3.6-liter V6 twin-turbo engine through a 7-speed transmission.

Interestingly, the 911 GT3 has a flat six engine. It still goes like the clappers, however. This beautiful sports car first appeared in 1999 and is built to this day.

The fastest car in a straight line at Le Mans in 1978, the Porsche 935/78 Moby Dick (ok, it does look like a whale from the side) clocked 228 mph. That didn't help much and the 935/78 only finished 8th.

The Cayenne, a luxury crossover SUV certainly raised eyebrows when it was released in 2002. It produced a number of firsts for the company in that it was the first four-door vehicle ever produced and the first off-road machine designed and built by Porsche.

The Porsche 956 holds the record for the fastest lap ever around the famed circuit, Nurburgring Nordschleife. This was set by Stefan Beloff in 1983 and stands at 6:11.13.

A Porsche from the 80's, the 959 was produced for a period of two years between 1986 and 1988 and again from 1992 to 1993. Only 345 were built. It originated as a rally car, but 200 production models had to be built as per FIA rules.

Porsche have a rich racing heritage and in the 917/30, certainly had a formidable track car. Racing in the Canadian-American Challenge Cup, the 917/30 dominated in 1973, winning six of the eight races.

Built between 1957 and 1962, the Porsche 718 was a racing car from the German manufacturer. It was powered by a 142 brake horsepower, 1.5-liter boxer engine. In 1961, a Porsche 718 driven by Masten Gregory and Bob Holbert won its class at the Le Mans 24-hour endurance race.

The 360 Cisitalia race car was introduced by Porsche in 1949. It was actually commissioned with Ferdinand Porsche released from a French Prison after World War II to design it.

An entry-level Porsche built between 1965 and 1969, the 912 is a variant of the 911. Initially, it even outsold its more famous sibling. Although it was not as powerful as the 911, it was incredibly fuel efficient.

The GT3 RS was first introduced in 2003. This is a lightweight racing version of the GT3 with a polycarbonate windshield and carbon fiber hood and spoiler. It has a top speed of over 190 mph.

Marketed by Porsche between 2004 and 2012, the 997 is available as a two-door coupe, convertible, speedster or Targa. Interestingly, the largest engine put into the 997 was just a 4.0-liter flat six.

A two-seat rear wheel drive sports car from Porsche, the Cayman was introduced in 2006. It is named after the Caiman, a reptile similar to an alligator. Porsche, however, chose a different spelling.

The Porsche 959 was originally designed to take part in the Group B rally championship, but when that was canceled, Porsche unleashed their machine on the Dakar Rally. It took the first and second place in 1986.

The Porsche 804 was a Formula 1 race first introduced in 1962. Its flat-8 air-cooled engine produced around 180 brake horsepower. It was responsible for Porsche's only win in Formula 1 as a manufacturer, taking the checkered flag at the 1962 French Grand Prix.

Porsche produced this racing sports car from 1953 to 1956. The 1.5-liter Type 547 engine produced 108 brake horsepower. Another popular car at auction time, a Porsche 550 sold as recently as 2016 for $5.4 million.

Powered by a flat-four engine, the Porsche 787 race car was first introduced in 1959. It's engine made around 190 brake horsepower. This model even featured in a few Formula 1 races in 1961.

Designed with the help of Penske, the RS Spyder competed in the LMP2 racing class in 2005. It was hugely successful, winning the America Le Mans Series for three years from 2006 to 2008 and also gaining class victories at the 24-hour Le Mans endurance race in 2008 and 2009.

A street-legal racing car, the Porsche 906 was only produced in 1966. Only 50 were ever made, the requirement for the FIA to allow the 906 to race in various classes in Europe. It had a top speed of 280 km/h.

Strange name, strange looking car. Developed in 1968, the 909 Bergspyder was built with hill climbing competitions in mind. Its design formed the basis of the 908/3. With a plastic body and a 275 brake horsepower engine, the Bergspyder was capable of 0-60 mph in under 2 seconds!

A beautiful Porsche racing car, the 962 was introduced in 1984 and mostly raced in endurance events around the world. A few of the 3.0-liter twin-turbo flat-6 engined cars were even converted for road use!

A two-seat roadster powered by either a standard flat-4 or flat-6 engine, the 914 was offered by Porsche between 1969 and 1976. Over 118,000 were made with engines ranging from 1.7 to 2.0-liters.

A simply stunning example of the design genius of Ferdinand Porsche, the 904 was introduced in 1964 and produced till 1965. It is also known as the Carerra GTS.

The 991 Carrera S was introduced in 2011. It is powered by a 350 brake horsepower 3.4-liter engine.

A luxury grand tourer, the 928 was first produced by Porsche in 1977 and manufactured for an 18-year period until 1995. The 928 was the first model from Porsche to have a V8 engine.

Available as a coupe or cabriolet, the front-engined Porsche 944 was based on the 924. 163,000 of these were built between 1982 and 1991. The 944 offered engine options ranging from 2.5 to 3.0-liter, all of them straight-six.

Porsche introduced this coupe/convertible in 1992 and marketed it for a four-year period until 1995. Top of the range 968's were powered by a 3.0-liter turbocharged engine that produced 305 brake horsepower.

Made between 2004 and 2012, the 987 was designed by Pinky Lai. The largest powerplant put in a 987 was a 3.4-liter flat-6 engine which produced 291 brake horsepower.

The famed Porsche 911 was originally going to be called the 901. Around 60 were built before Porsche was forced to change the name by Peugeot who already used the middle 0 naming convention. None of them were ever sold to customers, and Porsche mostly used them as exhibition models.

First introduced in the 2016, the 982 is Porsche's designation for the 718 Boxter.

Only 918 units of the 918 Spider were made between 2013 and 2015. This hybrid was powered by a 4.6-liter V8 engine and two electric motors. Altogether, these produced 858 brake horsepower!

Designed by Harm Lagaay, the Carerra GT is a mid-engined, two-door roaster that Porsche first introduced in 2003. It was manufactured until 2007 with 1,270 produced. The GT is capable of a 0-60 mph time of just 2.06 seconds thanks to its 5.7-liter V10 engine.

The SC was a variant of the famous Porsche 911 made from 1978 to 1983. Its all-aluminum 3.0-liter engine produced around 188 brake horsepower.

The third generation of the Boxter, the 918 was marketed by Porsche from 2012 to 2016.

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Image: Trick on via Wiki Commons

About This Quiz

Most auto lovers would agree that Porsche makes some fantastic sports cars. There is just some about that fine German engineering that sets hearts aflutter around the world.

And Porsche has a long history indeed. Although the company only produced cars from after the Second World War, Ferdinand Porsche was involved in automotive design for many years before that. Unbelievably, Porsche not only created the first gasoline-electric hybrid vehicle but he also designed possibly the most famous car ever produced, the Volkswagen Beetle.

Incredibly, his Lohner-Porsche hybrid was made at the turn of the 20th century and built until 1905. Following the Second World War, Porsche, who was a member of the Nazi party, was imprisoned in France. He was eventually released in the late 1940's and the first vehicle with the Porsche name, the 356, was produced.

And that was the start of something special. Preferring rear-engine, rear wheel drive designs, Porsche not only made road cars but several early racing cars as well, some of which appeared in early Formula One racing.

In the 2000's, the Porsche design branched out further to include a four-door luxury sedan with that distinctive Porsche look, a luxury grand tourer, and even an SUV.

Now would you be able to identify these different Porsche models from just an image? 

Let's see...

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